TReQ video series (improving the transparency, reproducibility and quality of your research)

04 January, 2022

Reading time: 2 minutes

This series of six short videos from our team at University College London introduces the TReQ (Transparency, Reproducibility, Quality) principles and explains their importance and general benefits.

Introduction to the TReQ project: Improving the transparency, reproducibility and quality of your research

Are you researching energy systems and demand, or other applied multidisciplinary subjects? Interested in learning more about why and how to make your research more transparent, reproducible and high quality? Or introducing these topics into your teaching?

Video transcript

My name is Gesche Huebner, and with my colleagues Nicole Watson and Mike fell I will be speaking about how and why to introduce TReQ into your research. We will take you through four tools you can use to improve the TReQ of your research: pre-registration of studies, reporting guidelines, preprints, and open data and open code. For each we will cover how the approach is used, what the benefits are for you as a researcher but also for science more generally. Alongside we’ll also discuss commonly cited drawbacks. In the final video, we’ll draw it all together and show you how you can implement the TReQ tools into your workflow. We will also share the TReQ list with you, a checklist which you can use to document how you’ve been using tools to promote the TReQ of your own research. There is a lot to bear in mind but there’s also loads of great resources out there to help you. So let’s jump in!

This series of six short videos produced by CREDS researchers at University College London introduces the TReQ (Transparency, Reproducibility, Quality) principles and explains their importance and general benefits. We also reflect on the extra challenges that applied research poses. Designed to support self-directed learning or for use as teaching material, we hope you will find them useful.

More resources, including workshop materials and further reading can be found on the Open Science Framework website.

See also the CREDS-funded research paper: Huebner, G.M., Fell, M.J. and Watson, N.E., 2021. Improving energy research practices: guidance for transparency, reproducibility and quality. Buildings and Cities, 2(1), pp.1–20. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/bc.67

Banner photo credit: Christian Perner on Unsplash